How I Made $920 on Fiverr in 10 Days

For those who don’t know what Fiverr is. Fiverr.com is the largest service in the world for the sale and purchase of services for $ 5. You can sell anything there, for example, New Year’s greetings in Russian, sending greeting cards from Siberia, various consultations (if you know the language), design services, in general, anything you can think of. Any service is called a gig there.

My gigs on Fiverr

At first, I was hesitant to put anything up for sale that would require immediate execution time. After all, a $ 4 job (which remains after the 20% Fiverr commission) is not something you want to be aiming for in life.

So I started by selling a couple of books, and by the way, I got pretty good results – one of them sold even better than on Amazon. The concept was simple. People sent me links to their sites, and I expressed thoughts on how they can be improved.

Nothing supernatural! The preparation of the video took several minutes, and the videos themselves lasted 5-7 minutes each (plus another couple of minutes for uploading and sending). If done in a row, I could get a decent hourly rate of about $ 24. Not very impressive, I understand, but it was an experiment!

In total, I have created several dozen of these videos over the past few months. Orders slowly appeared, and I answered them. The reviews were good, it didn’t take much time, and in general, it was quite interesting. In this small experiment, I earned $ 200-400 per month.

How I got to the main page

One morning last month, I was really surprised to see a dozen new order notifications in my inbox!

  • First of all, I thought that someone had recommended my gig to a large number of friends, or that it had appeared somewhere in a big way. I went to the Fiverr.com homepage and for sure! Here I am:
  • Fiverr, of course, does not publish information about what it takes to get to its home page, so what follows can be considered my personal conclusions based on observations.
  • According to Alexa.com, Fiverr is the 64th most popular website in the US and 131st in the world.
  • So getting to its main page is worth a lot.
  • With the competition of more than 3 million gigs, it is far from easy to stand out there. (Although compared to the number of sites indexed by Google, for example, this level of competition is still relatively low.).
  • Sellers do not pay for posting on the site; I’m sure the algorithm is partially responsible for choosing who gets to the main page and who gets to the lists, but it seems to me that this process is at least partially but manual.

Here are the criteria I think they use:

This is the first impression of the site, and therefore it is necessary to show a wide range of offers for a wide variety of visitors.

  • Anything people don’t expect to get for $ 5.
  • A high-value proposal is a must because it is directly related to factor 3.
  • An offer with a proven high conversion rate.
  • Fiverr tracks the conversion of each gig in the last month, that is, the percentage of people who actually used your offer in relation to everyone who viewed it.

The typical conversion rate on Fiverr is 5-10%. After posting my gig on the homepage and the initial flow of orders, its conversion reached 22%! (As you can see, it has collapsed somewhat since then.)

Needless to say, Fiverr wants to promote the gigs with the highest conversion rates since they only make money from sales.

  • High average order value.
  • Like the conversion rate factor, a high average order value increases the chances of your gig getting to the homepage.
  • Despite the fact that Fiverr is known as a marketplace where everything costs $ 5, upsells (i.e., the sale of additional services) are expected from sellers – this increases their revenues and, as a result, Fiverr’s revenues. (And for additional services the company takes a commission of 20%).
  • All things being equal, it seems to me that they are more likely to show a gig with an average cost of $ 10 than one from which additional services are never sold. It’s more beneficial for Fiverr.
  • Positive reviews.
  • Another criterion that made my list of the top 5 ways to get to the Fiverr homepage is great reviews. Aim for 100% positive reviews and try to have a high percentage of customers leaving positive reviews in relation to those who do not write anything at all.
  • Nothing is unattainable. When I got to the main page, I had 60-70 positive reviews.
  • Because Fiverr only earns a dollar per order, their business is built on loyal loyal customers. They will not jeopardize their reputation or show on the main gig with questionable reviews.

All sellers on Fiverr are rated Newbie (no tier), Tier 1, Tier 2, and Top Sellers. It is very rare on the main page to see sellers below the second level.

A quick guide to Fiverr levels:

  • Level 1 – Your account has been active for at least 30 days and you have 10 sales.
  • Level 2 – you have 50 sales in 60 days.

He services himself.

Based on what I see, there are few digital services directly out there. Instead, Fiverr prefers to promote gigs that require a certain personal touch.

Extra Income

As orders were pouring into my mailbox in frightening quantities, I began to worry that I would not have enough time for them all. To give me a break, I went into settings and changed the promised lead time from 3 to 6 days. Of course, it took time to complete all orders without losing quality. I had to fuss for several days to figure it out.

Leave a Comment